How Climate Change Will Transform How We Live

how climate changes2 life 4 20 
Solar panels have become increasingly common on homes as prices have fallen. Ben McCanna/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

It’s easy to feel pessimistic when scientists around the world are warning that climate change has advanced so far, it’s now inevitable that societies will either transform themselves or be transformed. But as two of the authors of a recent international climate report, we also see reason for optimism.

The latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change discuss changes ahead, but they also describe how existing solutions can reduce greenhouse gas emissions and help people adjust to impacts of climate change that can’t be avoided.

The problem is that these solutions aren’t being deployed fast enough. In addition to push-back from industries, people’s fear of change has helped maintain the status quo.

To slow climate change and adapt to the damage already underway, the world will have to shift how it generates and uses energy, transports people and goods, designs buildings and grows food. That starts with embracing innovation and change.

Fear of change can lead to worsening change

From the industrial revolution to the rise of social media, societies have undergone fundamental changes in how people live and understand their place in the world.

Some transformations are widely regarded as bad, including many of those connected to climate change. For example, about half the world’s coral reef ecosystems have died because of increasing heat and acidity in the oceans. Island nations like Kiribati and coastal communities, including in Louisiana and Alaska, are losing land into rising seas.

Residents of the Pacific island nation of Kiribati describe the changes they’re experiencing as sea level rises.

Other transformations have had both good and bad effects. The industrial revolution vastly raised standards of living for many people, but it spawned inequality, social disruption and environmental destruction.

People often resist transformation because their fear of losing what they have is more powerful than knowing they might gain something better. Wanting to retain things as they are – known as status quo bias – explains all sorts of individual decisions, from sticking with incumbent politicians to not enrolling in retirement or health plans even when the alternatives may be rationally better.


 Get The Latest By Email

Weekly Magazine Daily Inspiration

This effect may be even more pronounced for larger changes. In the past, delaying inevitable change has led to transformations that are unnecessarily harsh, such as the collapse of some 13th-century civilizations in what is now the U.S. Southwest. As more people experience the harms of climate change firsthand, they may begin to realize that transformation is inevitable and embrace new solutions.

A mix of good and bad

The IPCC reports make clear that the future inevitably involves more and larger climate-related transformations. The question is what the mix of good and bad will be in those transformations.

If countries allow greenhouse gas emissions to continue at a high rate and communities adapt only incrementally to the resulting climate change, the transformations will be mostly forced and mostly bad.

For example, a riverside town might raise its levees as spring flooding worsens. At some point, as the scale of flooding increases, such adaptation hits its limits. The levees necessary to hold back the water may become too expensive or so intrusive that they undermine any benefit of living near the river. The community may wither away.

The riverside community could also take a more deliberate and anticipatory approach to transformation. It might shift to higher ground, turn its riverfront into parkland while developing affordable housing for people who are displaced by the project, and collaborate with upstream communities to expand landscapes that capture floodwaters. Simultaneously, the community can shift to renewable energy and electrified transportation to help slow global warming.

Optimism resides in deliberate action

The IPCC reports include numerous examples that can help steer such positive transformation.

For example, renewable energy is now generally less expensive than fossil fuels, so a shift to clean energy can often save money. Communities can also be redesigned to better survive natural hazards through steps such as maintaining natural wildfire breaks and building homes to be less susceptible to burning.

how climate changes life 4 20
Costs are falling for key forms of renewable energy and electric vehicle batteries. IPCC Sixth Assessment Report

Land use and the design of infrastructure, such as roads and bridges, can be based on forward-looking climate information. Insurance pricing and corporate climate risk disclosures can help the public recognize hazards in the products they buy and companies they support as investors.

No one group can enact these changes alone. Everyone must be involved, including governments that can mandate and incentivize changes, businesses that often control decisions about greenhouse gas emissions, and citizens who can turn up the pressure on both.

Transformation is inevitable

Efforts to both adapt to and mitigate climate change have advanced substantially in the last five years, but not fast enough to prevent the transformations already underway.

Doing more to disrupt the status quo with proven solutions can help smooth these transformations and create a better future in the process.

About The Authors

Robert Lempert, Professor of Policy Analysis, Pardee RAND Graduate School and Elisabeth Gilmore, Associate Professor of Climate Change, Technology and Policy, Carleton University

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


Recommended Books:

Yellowstone's Wildlife in Transition

Yellowstone's Wildlife in TransitionOver thirty experts detect worrying signs of a system under strain. They identify three overriding stressors: invasive species, private-sector development of unprotected lands, and a warming climate. Their concluding recommendations will shape the twenty-first-century discussion over how to confront these challenges, not only in American parks but for conservation areas worldwide. Highly readable and fully illustrated.

For more info or to order "Yellowstone's Wildlife in Transition" on Amazon.

The Energy Glut: Climate Change and the Politics of Fatness

The Energy Glut: Climate Change and the Politics of Fatnessby Ian Roberts. Expertly tells the story of energy in society, and places 'fatness' next to climate change as manifestations of the same fundamental planetary malaise. This exciting book argues that the pulse of fossil fuel energy not only started the process of catastrophic climate change, but also propelled the average human weight distribution upwards. It offers and appraises for the reader a set of personal and political de-carbonising strategies.

For more info or to order "The Energy Glut" on Amazon.

Last Stand: Ted Turner's Quest to Save a Troubled Planet

Last Stand: Ted Turner's Quest to Save a Troubled Planet by Todd Wilkinson and Ted Turner. Entrepreneur and media mogul Ted Turner calls global warming the most dire threat facing humanity, and says that the tycoons of the future will be minted in the development of green, alternative renewable energy. Through Ted Turner's eyes, we consider another way of thinking about the environment, our obligations to help others in need, and the grave challenges threatening the survival of civilization.

For more info or to order "Last Stand: Ted Turner's Quest..." on Amazon.


You May Also Like

follow InnerSelf on

facebook icontwitter iconyoutube iconinstagram iconpintrest iconrss icon

 Get The Latest By Email

Weekly Magazine Daily Inspiration

AVAILABLE LANGUAGES

enafarzh-CNzh-TWdanltlfifrdeeliwhihuiditjakomsnofaplptroruesswsvthtrukurvi

MOST READ

death by pollution 11 11
Air Pollution May Cause Far More Deaths Than Previously Thought
by Katherine Gombay
To arrive at this conclusion, the researchers combined health and mortality data for seven million…
witchcraft and america 11 15
What Greek Myth Tells Us About Modern Witchcraft
by Joel Christensen
Living on the North Shore in Boston in the fall brings the gorgeous turning of the leaves and…
African woman wearing a headress with eyes closed and smile
Four Requirements for Living in Joy
by Andrew Harvey and Carolyn Baker, Ph.D.,
Nothing is more important for the future of humanity than a global return to joy. At a moment of…
people holding hands
7 Ways to Change the World and Our Communities
by Cormac Russell and John McKnight
Aside from connecting for neighborliness, what other functions do vibrant neighborhoods undertake?…
arches reflected in water
Selfishness in a Monastery: Leadership Lessons from a Monk and His Brother
by David C. Bentall
"Shortly after my brother got married he called me to apologize. He said he hadn't realized how…
making businesses accountable 11 14
How Businesses Can Walk the Talk on Social and Economic Challenges
by Simon Pek and Sébastien Mena
Businesses are facing increasing pressures to tackle social and environmental challenges like…
young woman or girl standing against a graffiti wall
Coincidence As Exercise for the Mind
by Bernard Beitman, M.D.
Paying close attention to coincidences exercises the mind. Exercise benefits the mind just as it…
failure leads to success 11 9
How Early Failure Can Lead To Success Later
by Stephen Langston
Failing early in our careers can make us question whether we are on the right path. We may look at…

New Attitudes - New Possibilities

InnerSelf.comClimateImpactNews.com | InnerPower.net
MightyNatural.com | WholisticPolitics.com | InnerSelf Market
Copyright ©1985 - 2021 InnerSelf Publications. All Rights Reserved.