Stuff In Sunscreen May Play A Part In Breast Cancer

Women laying in the pool with her arms on the edge, wearing a sun hat
Image by Free-Photos 

The common sunscreen ingredient benzophenone-3, also known as oxybenzone or BP-3, can play a role in the development of mammary gland tumors, according to new research in mice.

“Our set of results suggest caution in using BP-3 and the need to dig deeper to understand what it can do in mammary glands and tumorigenesis,” says Richard Schwartz, professor in the microbiology and molecular genetics department at Michigan State University, who has been researching the interaction of diet and cancer cell growth and proliferation for more than 12 years.

“This is the first published result that makes a convincing case that BP-3 can change cancer outcomes.”

The study appears in Oncotarget.

Schwartz and coauthor Sandra Haslam, professor emeritus in the physiology department, previously conducted successful experiments in mouse models that elucidated a relationship between diets high in saturated animal fats with higher incidence and shorter latency of breast cancer.

“We were excited about the results of our diet experiments, but the [the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)] was interested in funding a chemical study, so we decided to combine the two,” Schwartz says.

The researchers landed on BP-3, a ubiquitous and easily absorbed chemical. A recent report in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that after just one heavy application of sunscreen, blood levels of BP-3 exceeded the Federal Drug Administration’s guidance for chemicals at a threshold of toxicological concern, and the Centers for Disease Control found BP-3 in 98% of adult urine samples.


 Get The Latest By Email

Weekly Magazine Daily Inspiration

BP-3 is also a suspected endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC), substances that interfere with hormonally regulated processes the body uses for a wide range of functions, including mammary gland development.

Using a mouse model where the mammary glands lacked a gene often mutated in human breast cancer as a proxy for women growing from puberty into adulthood, the researchers put the mice under three distinct dietary regimes: a lifelong low-fat diet, a high-fat diet during puberty switching to a low-fat diet during reproductive years, and vice versa.

The experiment split mice on these three diets into two groups. One of these groups was fed BP-3 daily at a dose equivalent to a heavy application of sunscreen on a beach day.

Over the course of a year and a half of treatment, the researchers collected tumors from the mice and found robust evidence for the adverse effects of diet and BP-3 on breast cancer development.

“You never know what you’re going to find in experiments like these,” Schwartz says. “I was prepared to see no difference at all from BP-3 in any of our diets, but we found that even a relatively brief exposure to a high-fat diet during puberty is enough to allow BP-3 to cause a change in the outcome for cancer.”

Nearly all mice developed two kinds of aggressive breast cancer tumors. The first, known as epithelial tumors, retain many of the properties of normal mammary gland cells. The second, known as spindle cell tumors, lose most of the properties of normal cells and develop into a deadly, often triple negative form of breast cancer known as claudin-low breast cancer.

The effects of BP-3 varied depending on when the mice were fed a certain type of diet. For example, mice given a lifelong low-fat diet surprisingly acquired some protection against epithelial tumors from the chemical BP-3 but had spindle cell tumors with more aggressive properties. A high-fat diet during puberty, on the other hand, completely blocked any protective effect of BP-3 and caused epithelial tumors to grow more aggressively. The last treatment, a high-fat diet during adulthood, promoted aggressive epithelial tumors.

Interestingly, the researchers also found that before tumors appeared, BP-3 increased the growth of normal breast cells on all diets, a known correlate of more aggressive cancers.

“BP-3 will likely not have the same impact on groups of women with dietary differences, and that’s an important question to ask when designing experiments that study the effects of EDC’s and cancer,” Schwartz explains. “In balance, these results suggest that there are enough bad effects from BP-3 overall that we believe it calls for the precautionary principle.

“When there are alternatives, stay away from BP-3,” recommends Schwartz, who notes that zinc oxide and titanium dioxide creams are good candidates.

About the Authors

The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program housed in the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) funded the research.

The grant supporting Schwartz’s bench research also encompassed areas of epidemiology and outreach. Epidemiologists at the University of Cincinnati are studying a cohort of young women at varying ages and levels of BP-3 to track any reproduction abnormalities. A breast cancer advocacy group, the Huntington Breast Cancer Action Coalition, is generating messages for women in New York with help from the grant, and Schwartz collaborated with health science communication researchers at Michigan State University.

Source: Michigan State University

Original Study


Recommended Books: Health

Fresh Fruit CleanseFresh Fruit Cleanse: Detox, Lose Weight and Restore Your Health with Nature's Most Delicious Foods [Paperback] by Leanne Hall.
Lose weight and feel vibrantly healthy while clearing your body of toxins. Fresh Fruit Cleanse offers everything you need for an easy and powerful detox, including day-by-day programs, mouth-watering recipes, and advice for transitioning off the cleanse.
Click here for more info and/or to order this book on Amazon.

Thrive FoodsThrive Foods: 200 Plant-Based Recipes for Peak Health [Paperback] by Brendan Brazier.
Building upon the stress-reducing, health-boosting nutritional philosophy introduced in his acclaimed vegan nutrition guide Thrive, professional Ironman triathlete Brendan Brazier now turns his attention to your dinner plate (breakfast bowl and lunch tray too).
Click here for more info and/or to order this book on Amazon.

Death by Medicine by Gary NullDeath by Medicine by Gary Null, Martin Feldman, Debora Rasio and Carolyn Dean
The medical environment has become a labyrinth of interlocking corporate, hospital, and governmental boards of directors, infiltrated by the drug companies. The most toxic substances are often approved first, while milder and more natural alternatives are ignored for financial reasons. It's death by medicine.
Click here for more info and/or to order this book on Amazon.


More Articles By This Author

You May Also Like

AVAILABLE LANGUAGES

enafarzh-CNzh-TWnltlfifrdehiiditjakomsnofaptruessvtrvi

follow InnerSelf on

facebook icontwitter iconyoutube iconinstagram iconpintrest iconrss icon

 Get The Latest By Email

Weekly Magazine Daily Inspiration

Marie T. Russell's Daily Inspiration

INNERSELF VOICES

Becoming Parents: A Path to Transformation
Becoming Parents: A Path to Transformation
by Barry and Joyce Vissell
For almost every couple, the thought of bringing a child into this world triggers a whole range of…
I Was Born during the late Eastern Han Dynasty...
I Was Born during the late Eastern Han Dynasty...
by Dena Merriam
I was born during the late Eastern Han Dynasty (25 CE-220 CE) into a family of ardent Daoists who…
Healing Otherness: Your Changes, Reflected in Community
Healing Otherness: Your Changes, Reflected in Community
by Stacee L. Reicherzer PhD
Seeking out a community of healing, being exploited in it, perhaps assuming the shame and…
Horoscope Week: June 14 - 20, 2021
Horoscope Current Week: June 14 - 20, 2021
by Pam Younghans
This weekly astrological journal is based on planetary influences, and offers perspectives and…
Being A Better Person
Being A Better Person
by Marie T. Russell
"He makes me want to be a better person." As I reflected on this statement later, I realized that…
Modeling Behavior is the Best Teacher: Respect Must Be Mutual
Modeling Behavior is the Best Teacher: Respect Must Be Mutual
by Carmen Viktoria Gamper
Socially respected behavior is learned behavior and some of it (for instance, table manners) varies…
Separation and Isolation vs. Community and Compassion
Separation and Isolation vs. Community and Compassion
by Lawrence Doochin
When we are in community, we automatically fall into service to those in need because we know them…
The Only Easy Day Was Yesterday
The Only Easy Day Was Yesterday
by Jason Redman
Ambushes don’t just happen in combat. In business and life, an ambush is a catastrophic event that…

MOST READ

Becoming Parents: A Path to Transformation
Becoming Parents: A Path to Transformation
by Barry and Joyce Vissell
For almost every couple, the thought of bringing a child into this world triggers a whole range of…
How to Build New Bone... Naturally
How to Build New Bone... Naturally
by Maryon Stewart
Many women assume that when their menopause symptoms stop, they are on safe ground. Sadly, we face…
image
IRS hitting you with a fine or late fee? Don't fret – a consumer tax advocate says you still have options
by Rita W. Green, Instructor of Accountancy, University of Memphis
Tax Day has come and gone, and you think you filed your return in the nick of time. But several…
How Well Your Immune System Works Can Depend On The Time Of Day
How Well Your Immune System Works Can Depend On The Time Of Day
by Annie Curtis, RCSI University of Medicine and Health Sciences
When microorganisms – such as bacteria or viruses – infect us, our immune system jumps into action.…
A teen reads her phone with a confused look on her face
Why teens have a hard time finding truth online
by Stanford
A new national study shows a woeful inability by high schoolers to detect fake news on the internet.
From deadly enemy to covidiots: Words matter when talking about COVID-19
Words matter when talking about COVID-19
by Ruth Derksen, PhD, Philosophy of Language, Faculty of Applied Science, Emeritus, University of British Columbia
So much has been said and written about the COVID-19 pandemic. We’ve been flooded with metaphors,…
image
The mystery of long COVID: up to 1 in 3 people who catch the virus suffer for months. Here's what we know so far
by Vanessa Bryant, Laboratory Head, Immunology Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute
Most people who get COVID suffer the common symptoms of fever, cough and breathing problems, and…
Planning the Burial: Anticipating Possible Problems and Blessings
Planning the Burial: Anticipating Possible Problems and Blessings
by Elizabeth Fournier
In addition to the emotional and spiritual aspects of funerals, there are always logistical and…

New Attitudes - New Possibilities

InnerSelf.comClimateImpactNews.com | InnerPower.net
MightyNatural.com | WholisticPolitics.com | InnerSelf Market
Copyright ©1985 - 2021 InnerSelf Publications. All Rights Reserved.